A Familiar Cry: “I Need More Volunteers!”

People in your church are probably used to seeing things go well each week—lights come on, microphones work, cameras capture video. So they may just assume you have the help you need...

A Familiar Cry: “I Need More Volunteers!”
Each church has its own flavor and style of getting information to the congregation, and it’s up to you to determine if you’ve utilized those methods to the their fullest. Whether it’s a bulletin, a mailed newsletter, a weekly email blast, a hallway slide loop, or a video announcement, find a way to present the need for volunteers to your congregation.
A Familiar Cry: “I Need More Volunteers!”
Each church has its own flavor and style of getting information to the congregation, and it’s up to you to determine if you’ve utilized those methods to the their fullest. Whether it’s a bulletin, a mailed newsletter, a weekly email blast, a hallway slide loop, or a video announcement, find a way to present the need for volunteers to your congregation.

Volunteer Recruitment News

A Familiar Cry: “I Need More Volunteers!”
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Volunteer Recruitment: Finding, Keeping Tech Volunteers

Team Management Resource

Worship Facilities Magazine, September-October 2017
The September-October 2017 issue of Worship Facilities Magazine offers a glance at a Granger Community Church, and their recent install of a Lawo audio mixing console system.
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Do you find yourself saying that more and more each week as Sunday approaches?

Do you avoid looking at Planning Center, because you know it will tell you that there’s still “1 Person Needed” in more than one position this weekend?

Do you daydream, thinking about the day when you’ll have a volunteer roster full to the point of overflowing?

The good news is that you CAN get to the point of having a full volunteer team. The other good piece of news is that it doesn’t come easy and it won’t happen overnight.

Rushing into adding new volunteers too quickly and without a plan can lead to missed opportunities and chaos…

Wait… What?

That doesn’t sound like good news, but I assure you it is. Here’s why: Building a volunteer team takes time, determination, and a whole lot of communication, but the payoff for all that work can be extraordinary.

Rushing into adding new volunteers too quickly and without a plan can lead to missed opportunities and chaos, and I know this because it’s a mistake that I used to make all the time.

So here are some simple ways that I’ve found to recruit for and grow a volunteer media or production team that can scale to a church of any size.

Advertise.

When I first became frustrated at the small size of our volunteer team, I wondered why people weren’t just flocking to the booth on Sundays to sign up. After all, what we do in the production world is not only vital to our services, it’s also fun!

People in your church are probably used to seeing things go well each week—lights come on, microphones work, cameras capture video. So they may just assume you have the help you need, and that you’re only looking for people who come with previous experience.

Each church has its own flavor and style of getting information to the congregation, and it’s up to you to determine if you’ve utilized those methods to the their fullest. Whether it’s a bulletin, a mailed newsletter, a weekly email blast, a hallway slide loop, or a video announcement, find a way to present the need for volunteers to your congregation.

Let them know upfront what your expectations are. Is previous experience necessary? Do you offer training? What is the time commitment? How do I sign up?

Don’t just rely on passive advertising, though, as it’s unrealistic to expect people to come to us; we need to also go to them. Getting out of the comfort of the booth or production room and talking to the people who make up your congregation is a great way to find volunteers.


More About Adam Dye
Adam Dye is the Media Director at Brentwood Baptist Church, just south of Nashville, Tennessee, where he oversees production for the church’s six campuses. Originally working in the recording industry, he’s had the opportunity to work with some of the greatest country, Christian, and rock artists in the country, but most loves working with the amazing volunteers who serve alongside him at the church. He spends time each summer with high school friends hiking the Appalachian trail, is his church staff’s resident Tour de France fan, and enjoys discovering bike trails and greenways around Nashville with his wife, Allison.
Get in Touch: adye@brentwoodbaptist.com    More by Adam Dye

Latest Resource

Worship Facilities Magazine, September-October 2017
The September-October 2017 issue of Worship Facilities Magazine offers a glance at a Granger Community Church, and their recent install of a Lawo audio mixing console system.


Article Topics

Team Management · Leadership · Spiritual Health · Team Development · Volunteers · Bulletin · Congregation · Newsletter · Planning Center · Production Teams · Video Announcement · All Topics

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