A Tech Team’s Work Behind Seeking Millennials

Having diverse technology in disciplines such as audio, video or lighting is great, but even better for the millennial is to see a worship environment that culturally resembles the body of Christ.

A Tech Team’s Work Behind Seeking Millennials
Ministry leadership, and worship tech team leaders, should be open to the idea of apprenticing, allowing millennials to shadow key positions where they can observe and learn during worship services. Hands-on learning is extremely beneficial.
A Tech Team’s Work Behind Seeking Millennials
Ministry leadership, and worship tech team leaders, should be open to the idea of apprenticing, allowing millennials to shadow key positions where they can observe and learn during worship services. Hands-on learning is extremely beneficial.

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One of the tougher challenges that churches often face is how to attract millennials to serve on their worship tech teams. To effectively attract or seek an individual for service, it is helpful to understand the characteristics, habits, and mindset of that individual.

This can hold true, especially if your lead staff is made up of baby boomers seeking millennials to serve on the worship tech team. Without understanding “what makes a millennial tick,” you might miss an opportunity to engage and attract a very important segment of society into your ranks.

Let’s explore a bit of information about this generation:

Ministry leadership, and worship tech team leaders, should be open to the idea of apprenticing, allowing millennials to shadow key positions where they can observe and learn during worship services.

The millennial generation is made up of those born between 1982 and 2002 (age 15 – 35). That adds up to some 81 million individuals who have already entered college and the workforce.  This generation will replace the baby boomers as they retire.

The millennials have different characteristics than any generation before them, because they have grown up in a society that is very different than any group before them. Many have been plugged into technology since they were babies. They are the most scheduled generation ever, are true multi-taskers, expect to have six to eight careers in their lifetime, and are attracted to diverse environments. The millennial student has been a different animal for their teachers.  K-12 institutions, colleges, universities and now the workforce are wondering how to motivate and meet the expectations of this generation. [1]

If we’re interested in attracting millennials to serve on our worship teams, our worship tech environment must be conducive to the task.

Using our worship environment at the House of Hope Worship Center on the South Side of Chicago as an example, we are committed to making an effort to involve millennials in our creative planning meetings. Being huge proponents of offering apprenticeship and internship opportunities to the local community, we have a relationship with the Art Institute of Chicago and often have third or fourth year students join our worship tech teams in the area that suits their interests and studies.

Our worship tech teams consist of Audio, Video, Lighting, and Stage Management Departments, and we ensure each of these disciplines has a fair amount of up to date technology (I hesitate to say “state-of-the-art” because technology is rapidly changing), that a millennial might find compelling.

The House of Hope Worship Center is a 10,000 seat arena that doubles as a performance space for touring concerts and special events. The stage is 100-feet by 70-feet, accommodating a 200-plus seat choir stand. Our theatrical lighting instruments are distributed across several 25 feet to 50 feet steel trusses that are raised and lowered to stage and house floor level, utilizing a computer controlled motorized cable and drum system, very similar to the chain and motor system used on major concert tours.


More About Kirk Denson
Kirk Denson is the Director of Audio and Technical Production at the House of Hope Worship Center, located in Chicago. Kirk is a veteran of the music industry, as a concert touring sound engineer, and also the film industry, as a sound designer and editor with a desire to give back to the community by way of his ministry work as the Founder and Executive Director of the MEMa studio. .
Get in Touch: [email protected]    More by Kirk Denson

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Article Topics

Team Management · Leadership · Team Development · Front of House · House of Hope Worship Center · Millennials · Planning Center · Pro Tools · Worship Tech Team · All Topics

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