Doing Video on a Budget: Buy What You Need To Get Going, Start With A Plan

If you are still capturing video in SD, and are looking to jump to HD (1280 by 720 pixels) or even Full HD (1920 by 1080 pixels), know you'll likely have to change out most of your cables, screens, and cameras.

Doing Video on a Budget: Buy What You Need To Get Going, Start With A Plan
At West Asheville Baptist, our current system began with three used video cameras. The process began after a company had upgraded a church, after which we bought the church's old equipment. The vast array of equipment we purchased ended up costing $25,000, but that included all of the gear and the installation, including cameras, cables, recorders, computers, monitors, and other associated equipment.

Video on a Budget News

Video on a Budget: Seek Cost-Effective Solutions Over Cutting Corners
Doing Video on a Budget: Buy What You Need To Get Going, Start With A Plan
Once Finished, Make Intro Video Easy to Share, Find
A Quick, Inexpensive Way to Shoot a Great Video Greeting for Your Church

Technology Resource

Worship Facilities Magazine, March-April 2018
The March-April 2018 issue of Worship Facilities Magazine offers articles about how to prepare, prevent and respond to church violence, a look into what church management software can do for your church community, and a piece on how a once popular nightclub venue was transitioned to become Shoreline Church's new home.
·

So, the pastor tells you that he wants to film the service every week.

This may sound backwards, but the easiest way to get better video is to get better sound.

Or maybe he wants to livestream your service every week.

Unfortunately, he says that you only have a limited budget to get that done.

Now what?

Most importantly, what does “limited” mean anyway?

No matter what your budget is, you can do this.

While you can always spend more, recognize that there are churches out there recording their services on $500 video cameras, and streaming to Facebook and YouTube using iPhones and tablets.

While I wouldn’t suggest going down that exact road, you can get the best quality from this setup. If that is all you have, you can still make it work.

If you want to do it right, though, you can build a system from the ground up or buy someone else’s old equipment, as there is a lot of used equipment for sale. There are even a few church groups that buy old gear, with the goal of then reselling it to churches on a budget like ours at West Asheville Baptist. For a list of these and others look at the WFX page for a list of vendors. And if you have not been to one of their events, I highly recommend it.

So, what do you need first to accomplishing video on a budget? Any guesses?

A good microphone.

This may sound backwards, but the easiest way to get better video is to get better sound.

And the fastest way to a bad video is by having bad sound.

If your budget demands that you can only choose between a microphone and a video camera, get the microphone and use a tablet to handle the video needs.

If you have microphones, speakers and an audio mixing console, you may be able to use that recording. Make a recording and listen to it. Unfortunately, the sound from a recording sounds different than it does in the room. This is because in the room, the sound bounces off walls, and some of it gets absorbed by people in the room.

In such a case, the sound tech is mixing for the room, not a recording. In this scenario, you have the ability to split the audio signals from each of the microphones and instruments and send them to a separate mix for your video or stream. This of course costs additional money, and you will need someone to operate that second sound board to create a separate mix.

This is where a good mic can help you.


More About Ralph Hicks
Ralph Hicks is the Tech Director for the West Asheville Baptist Church, based in Asheville, N.C. He started serving in church when he was seven and has been a part of the volunteer staff ever since. After singing in church and running sound for 20 years, he moved behind the camera where he spent several years. He was the church's Front of House Engineer, before becoming the Technical Director six years ago.
Get in Touch: rhicks@westashevillebaptist.org    More by Ralph Hicks

Latest Resource

Worship Facilities Magazine, March-April 2018
The March-April 2018 issue of Worship Facilities Magazine offers articles about how to prepare, prevent and respond to church violence, a look into what church management software can do for your church community, and a piece on how a once popular nightclub venue was transitioned to become Shoreline Church's new home.


Article Topics

Technology · Video · Team Management · Budgeting · Team Development · Budget · Cables · Cameras · Equipment · Facebook · Livestream · All Topics

Support and Enhance the Worship Message

The latest strategies for sound, lighting and facilities can help you better attract and engage with your congregation. With Worship Facilities’ insights on leadership, communication and administrative tools, each issue shows you how to design and maintain your facility and how to adapt it to meet the changing needs of today’s members.
Explore the success stories of others, and find ways to enhance your weekly services. Get a free subscription to Worship Facilities magazine.

Comments


Editor's Picks
©2018 WFX Network · A division of Informa · 1166 Avenue of the Americas, 10th Floor, New York, NY 10036 · All Rights Reserved.