Doing Video on a Budget: Buy What You Need To Get Going, Start With A Plan

If you are still capturing video in SD, and are looking to jump to HD (1280 by 720 pixels) or even Full HD (1920 by 1080 pixels), know you'll likely have to change out most of your cables, screens, and cameras.

Doing Video on a Budget: Buy What You Need To Get Going, Start With A Plan
At West Asheville Baptist, our current system began with three used video cameras. The process began after a company had upgraded a church, after which we bought the church's old equipment. The vast array of equipment we purchased ended up costing $25,000, but that included all of the gear and the installation, including cameras, cables, recorders, computers, monitors, and other associated equipment.

Video on a Budget News

Video on a Budget: Seek Cost-Effective Solutions Over Cutting Corners
Doing Video on a Budget: Buy What You Need To Get Going, Start With A Plan
Once Finished, Make Intro Video Easy to Share, Find
A Quick, Inexpensive Way to Shoot a Great Video Greeting for Your Church

Technology Resource

For Lighting Design, What Software Is The Right Match For Your Needs? (Part 3)
Dig into this final part of a three-part series that looks into choices for lighting design software, including Vectorworks and LightConverse, and how each can best serve the needs of your church.
·

At West Asheville Baptist, our current system began with three used video cameras. The process began after a company had upgraded a church, after which we bought the church’s old equipment. The vast array of equipment we purchased ended up costing $25,000, but that included all of the gear and the installation, including cameras, cables, recorders, computers, monitors, and other associated equipment.

If you are just starting out, I would begin with at least capturing video in HD, and not the lesser formats.

Keep the end in mind. Few churches can afford to buy all their needed equipment at once. Buy what you need to get going, but make sure to start with a plan, so that as you add gear, everything will work together.

Make sure that you can also upgrade important pieces as you go. If you are still capturing video in SD at this moment, and are looking to jump to HD (1280 by 720 pixels) or even Full HD (1920 by 1080 pixels), recognize that you will likely also have to change out most of your cables, screens, and cameras as well.

Plan for upgrades, and don’t forget to have good surge protectors for your recently purchased gear, along with redundant recording devices for sound and video. Having these backup systems in place is essential, as we have problems maybe four or five times a year, where they come in handy.

It is not if, but when, that you might be confronted with such an issue.

If you are recording to make DVDs, or are broadcasting your service, you will need to be able to record it to a computer, tape, or DVD. From there, you will need an editing program and someone to do the editing. The more you want to do, the more equipment and people you will need.

And let’s not forget lights.

While you don’t need a lot of lights to start working with video, you will still want to see those being filmed. Our eyes are amazing things, and can adjust to almost any lighting situation, but for cameras, they are, however, somewhat limited in this area. Those limits often come up when thinking about when confronted with the realities of one’s budget. Keep an eye out for cameras and lenses that are recognized for doing well in low light situations, but recognize that they will come at a price. Aside from that investment, you will need lights in front and behind your subject.


More About Ralph Hicks
Ralph Hicks is the Tech Director for the West Asheville Baptist Church, based in Asheville, N.C. He started serving in church when he was seven and has been a part of the volunteer staff ever since. After singing in church and running sound for 20 years, he moved behind the camera where he spent several years. He was the church's Front of House Engineer, before becoming the Technical Director six years ago.
Get in Touch: rhicks@westashevillebaptist.org    More by Ralph Hicks

Latest Resource

For Lighting Design, What Software Is The Right Match For Your Needs? (Part 3)
Dig into this final part of a three-part series that looks into choices for lighting design software, including Vectorworks and LightConverse, and how each can best serve the needs of your church.


Article Topics

Technology · Video · Team Management · Budgeting · Team Development · Equipment · Facebook · Livestream · Microphones · Screens · Service · All Topics

Support and Enhance the Worship Message

The latest strategies for sound, lighting and facilities can help you better attract and engage with your congregation. With Worship Facilities’ insights on leadership, communication and administrative tools, each issue shows you how to design and maintain your facility and how to adapt it to meet the changing needs of today’s members.
Explore the success stories of others, and find ways to enhance your weekly services. Get a free subscription to Worship Facilities magazine.

Comments


Editor's Picks
©2018 WFX Network · A division of Informa · 1166 Avenue of the Americas, 10th Floor, New York, NY 10036 · All Rights Reserved.