Have a Great Rehearsal, and the Weekend Will Be Amazing!

Quality rehearsals have three ingredients: the physical act of going through the song structure, the picking apart and fixing any mistakes or rough spots, and the dynamic of adding creativity or special elements to the songs or set of songs.

Have a Great Rehearsal, and the Weekend Will Be Amazing!
Let the band run through the songs at performance levels, getting your rough mix and correcting and adding anything need in monitors. Then: Go through the whole service twice. From countdown videos to announcements to slide and song transitions: Do it all!
Have a Great Rehearsal, and the Weekend Will Be Amazing!
Let the band run through the songs at performance levels, getting your rough mix and correcting and adding anything need in monitors. Then: Go through the whole service twice. From countdown videos to announcements to slide and song transitions: Do it all!

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From a leadership perspective, rehearsal and sound check are two of the most important things that a production team does on a regular basis.

The real challenge is: How can we leverage those times together to get better as a team and how can the time be spent well?

From my perspective, the only way teams, both technical and musician, can grow, get better and connect, is with a dedicated practice time.

If you do rehearsal well, the sound check is easy and the service feels awesome, because you have confidence in all elements of the flow.

I’ve talked to some worship leaders and technical directors that do not have a weekly rehearsal for their teams. From my perspective, the only way teams, both technical and musician, can grow, get better and connect, is with a dedicated practice time. Not every church can do this, as there are space, location, and schedule challenges, but I would encourage you to be creative and carve out some practice time.

The best option is to have full teams practicing in the actual worship space, before the weekend begins. This is ideal, as it gives everyone the chance to get dialed in, long before the services start. If that’s not possible, do everything you can to get the people in a room and go through everything in the service. Even a spare classroom or garage will be better than no practice or a hasty run through Sunday morning.

The key is to make the time worthwhile.

If you lead this, as the worship leader or tech director, you must be prepared.

Make sure you first are rock solid with all the songs, ideas for transitions, keys of songs, order and structure of both songs and service any media or special elements and how the service will end.

You can’t lead anyone, if you don’t know where things are going first!

Quality rehearsals have three ingredients: the physical act of going through the song structure, the picking apart and fixing any mistakes or rough spots, and the dynamic of adding creativity or special elements to the songs or set of songs.

First, you have to go through the arrangements together and discuss the actual song structure in terms of things like: number of verses and choruses, who will sing what part and where instruments come in and fade out.

The benefit of this is simply familiarity with the songs and familiarity gives confidence. If you want a team that plays confidently and is solid with transitions and flow, then you have to go through the songs.


More About Brian Wilson
As the Group and Men's Pastor at Calvary Community Church in Sumner, Wash., Brian has has worked in church and parachurch ministry for almost 20 years, having served as a creative director and production pastor at the church in the past. He has been involved in all areas of church ministry and writes and speaks about excellence in church ministry and healthy church leadership.
Get in Touch: [email protected]    More by Brian Wilson

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Learn about a half-dozen options that are particularly scalable, beginning with personal computer operability, all the way up to multiuniverse, full-size lighting consoles.


Article Topics

Team Management · Leadership · Spiritual Health · Team Development · Volunteers · Dedicated Practice Time · Elements · Leadership · Monitor Mix · Sound Check and Rehearsals · Tech Director · All Topics

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