Subwoofers: Configuration Options Matter for Your Worship Space

A small- to mid-sized church may need to implement anywhere between two to four subs, and a mid-sized to larger church may require between four to eight subwoofers.

Subwoofers: Configuration Options Matter for Your Worship Space
Among the many subwoofer options available on the market that could be ideal for your worship space, among the subwoofers that offer a 12-, 15-, 18-, or 21-inch woofer is the Electro-Voice ETX 15SP.
Subwoofers: Configuration Options Matter for Your Worship Space
Among the many subwoofer options available on the market that could be ideal for your worship space, among the subwoofers that offer a 12-, 15-, 18-, or 21-inch woofer is the Electro-Voice ETX 15SP.

Subwoofers News

Subwoofers: Configuration Options Matter for Your Worship Space
Yamaha VXL1 Ultra Compact Column Array Recently Launched at InfoComm
A Series of Solid Audio Demos Kick Off InfoComm 2017
Florida Church Adds AVL Gear to Reconfigured Assembly Space

Technology Resource

Worship Facilities Magazine, May-June 2017
The May-June 2017 issue of Worship Facilities Magazine includes a series of recent articles that appeared on the Worship Tech Director website over the last few months, as part of a special edition, first made available to InfoComm 2017 attendees.
·

Among the major components of a live sound system are subwoofers. Let’s take a closer look and explore.

Subwoofers, while entirely optional, add low-end “punch” to a sound system that a full range system is not capable of delivering on their own. If you’re considering adding subwoofers to your current full-range sound system at your worship facility, the following information will give you a pretty good idea of how subwoofers work and what to expect from them.

Depending on where the low frequency crossover points are set, the subwoofer can typically handle frequencies up to and including the 80 to 100 Hz range.

There are various types of subwoofers and placement options to consider, and we’ll review what some of them are.

Most full-range loudspeaker systems are comprised of a combination of a tweeter, mid-range driver and bass driver. The tweeter typically delivers high frequencies in the range of 2,000 to 20,000 Hz, while the mid-range driver often does so for frequencies in the 250 to 2,000 Hz range. Lastly, the low frequency driver often is tasked with frequencies ranging in the 60 to 250 Hz range.

To add lower or “sub-bass” frequencies, in the 20 to 60 Hz range to your sound system, you will need a subwoofer.

Depending on where the low frequency crossover points are set, the subwoofer can typically handle frequencies up to and including the 80 to 100 Hz range. Subwoofers, commonly referred to as “subs,” can be seamlessly added to any stereo or mono full-range sound system by using an active crossover, which receives audio from the mixing console. The crossover gathers the audio signal, segregates that signal to each speaker component (high frequency tweeter, mid-range driver, and low frequency driver), and that speaker enclosure then delivers the full range sound.

Most sound engineers might prefer to add sound to the subwoofer by using an aux, or separate mix bus, from the mixing console. This method is useful to reduce the number of sources feeding the subwoofers to include only the instruments that produce sub-bass frequencies. Those instruments include the bass guitar, bass (or “kick”) drum, keyboard synthesizers, and drum machines. This “aux-fed” method offers greater low end punch and clarity.

Subwoofers come in two varieties: passive and active. A passive subwoofer is just a woofer or woofers in an enclosure that must be driven by an external amplifier, providing the necessary power to be heard.  An active subwoofer will have an amplifier and crossover built into the enclosure. The size and seating capacity of your worship facility will determine the type and the amount of subwoofers needed to accompany the full-range sound system.


More About Kirk Denson
Kirk Denson is the Director of Audio and Technical Production at the House of Hope Worship Center, located in Chicago. Kirk is a veteran of the music industry, as a concert touring sound engineer, and also the film industry, as a sound designer and editor with a desire to give back to the community by way of his ministry work as the Founder and Executive Director of the MEMa studio. .
Get in Touch: [email protected]    More by Kirk Denson

Latest Resource

Worship Facilities Magazine, May-June 2017
The May-June 2017 issue of Worship Facilities Magazine includes a series of recent articles that appeared on the Worship Tech Director website over the last few months, as part of a special edition, first made available to InfoComm 2017 attendees.


Article Topics

Technology · Audio · Active · Amplifiers · Crossover · Enclosures · Frequencies · Full-Range · All Topics

Support and Enhance the Worship Message

The latest strategies for sound, lighting and facilities can help you better attract and engage with your congregation. With Worship Facilities’ insights on leadership, communication and administrative tools, each issue shows you how to design and maintain your facility and how to adapt it to meet the changing needs of today’s members.
Explore the success stories of others, and find ways to enhance your weekly services. Get a free subscription to Worship Facilities magazine. Subscribe today!

Comments

©2017 Worship TechDirector · A Division of EH Publishing, Inc. d.b.a EH Media. All Rights Reserved.