Video Production: Encourage Communication As a Team

It’s good for a team to know what their roles are on the project, and what the specific expectations are within each role, especially when your crew is small.

Video Production: Encourage Communication As a Team
By defining roles as listed in a production schedule, and including call times, that goes a long way in communicating with members of your team to avoid problems down the road.
Video Production: Encourage Communication As a Team
By defining roles as listed in a production schedule, and including call times, that goes a long way in communicating with members of your team to avoid problems down the road.

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Video Production: Encourage Communication As a Team

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Technology Resource

Worship Facilities Magazine, September-October 2017
The September-October 2017 issue of Worship Facilities Magazine offers a glance at a Granger Community Church, and their recent install of a Lawo audio mixing console system.
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“What are we doing and when can we leave (or ‘when’s lunch?’)”: Communication is a collaborative effort.

I remember hearing David Letterman years ago on The Late Show mockingly say this during his opening monologue. I quickly recognized it for what I occasionally hear said (as I’m sure Dave has) on productions run by seasoned crews. Usually, this is what’s said when there hasn’t been a lot of communication about what’s involved with the day’s production schedule and expectations.

On the subject of preproduction, I have written a previous article: “Filmmaking: Preproduction - Save Time, Money and Sanity.”

The piece was about some of the ways you can plan and what needs to happen on the shoot day.

Now we will look at some simple communication tools, so everyone is on the same page with what is expected of them and their roles on the shoot or production. This will help set the team up to win and minimize as many of the avoidable problems.

If you have ever planned any production project, you probably know that somehow an invitation gets sent to Murphy to show up and mess up our vision of how the day should go. Unfortunately, it’s part of the process of trying to create, while contending with limited time, budgets and resources.

Unforeseen events or problems happen.

The best we can do is problem solve what was unforeseen by communicating as much information as possible about the goals and expectations of the production day.

Without good communication, it’s like walking into a forest in autumn and trying to describe a beautifully colored leaf on a tree you’re looking at, but everyone else is looking at a different leaf thinking that is the one you are talking about.

I will attempt to give some suggestions to help make your shoot day go as smoothly as possible.

1) Defining Roles


It’s good for a team to know what their roles are on the project and what the specific expectations are within each role, especially when your crew is small. Be sure everyone knows each other’s roles, so you don’t duplicate efforts, or worse, something is not in place on the day and now you will have to scramble to overcome the oversight, thereby delaying or changing the end product.

For your less experienced team members, encourage them to speak up regarding any uncertainty, about what is expected, or how it should be done. Have frequent check-ins if they have what they need or are in place and are ready to go for the shoot.


More About Jim Sippel
Jim Sippel is a three-time Emmy© Award winning lighting designer. After working full-time with WCFC TV38 Chicago for 10 years, he joined Willow Creek Community Church in 2000, serving as Video Producer/Production Manager/Director of Photography. While at Willow Creek, he helped developed the capabilities of their video production department to tell powerful stories to advance the cause of Christ. Currently he works as an independent contractor, with his experience covering Lighting Design/Consulting, Director of Photography, Production Management, Production Design and many other production roles.
Get in Touch: jimsippel@gmail.com    More by Jim Sippel

Latest Resource

Worship Facilities Magazine, September-October 2017
The September-October 2017 issue of Worship Facilities Magazine offers a glance at a Granger Community Church, and their recent install of a Lawo audio mixing console system.


Article Topics

Technology · Video · Visual Arts · Video Production · Team Management · Spiritual Health · Team Development · Volunteers · Collaboration · Communication · Crews · Preproduction · Video Production · Volunteers · All Topics

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