Wired Microphones: Numerous Quality Options Worthy For Your Church

With the freedom of choice that using wired microphones does give you, it freely allows you to pick among the many microphone options that will sound best on each source.

Wired Microphones: Numerous Quality Options Worthy For Your Church
For the many wired mics available to work with as a kick drum mic, the Sennheiser e602, shown here, is one of the popular choices, and is also the most extreme sounding of the bunch.
Wired Microphones: Numerous Quality Options Worthy For Your Church
For the many wired mics available to work with as a kick drum mic, the Sennheiser e602, shown here, is one of the popular choices, and is also the most extreme sounding of the bunch.

Wired Microphones News

Wired Microphones: Numerous Quality Options Worthy For Your Church
To Wire Or Not to Wire, That Is The Question

Technology Resource

Worship Facilities Magazine, September-October 2017
The September-October 2017 issue of Worship Facilities Magazine offers a glance at a Granger Community Church, and their recent install of a Lawo audio mixing console system.
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Anderson WFX 2017

Mike has been a speaker previously at WFX. For 2018, the conference is slated for Orlando in November. We hope to see you there.

In this piece, I want to take some time and talk about microphones, specifically wired mics.

The great thing about a wired mic for vocals is you can choose whatever sounds best for a vocalist.

Now I realize that a lot of you are using wireless microphones for your vocals, and there are some great things about doing that, if you have five or six vocals onstage that are only singing. Among other things, it can really keep the stage clean and help avoid a trip hazard for your pastor. But there are some real advantages to using wired microphones for vocals that I want to cover, along with microphone choices for the rest of the band.

When I think about microphone selection, there are a few things that help determine what mic to choose for a particular source.

Polar patterns would be one that I would think about, depending on the input source. For instance, I might prefer to use a hypercardioid microphone on toms or snare drums, to help keep cymbal and hi-hat bleed to a minimum. Dynamic or condenser mics are another option to consider, depending on the source. It would probably work better to mic a violin or cello with a condenser, than using a dynamic mic, like a Shure SM57.

Size would be another thing I would look at, such as if the drum set is huge, with a lot of cymbals. Larger mics like a Sennheiser 421, would not work as well in such a setup, compared to a Shure Beta 98. In addition, if I’m in a loud volume situation, a microphone’s gain before feedback is something that becomes important.

The thing that I think about the most, though, when choosing a microphone, is its frequency response. Not just how high or low of a frequency response something has, but its sonic signature or character that is inherent to a particular microphone. It is the first EQ choice that you are making in your signal path, well before you touch your audio console.

With that in mind, I’d like to jump back into some advantages that wired vocal microphones offer over wireless mics. Normally, when you are selecting wireless microphones, you are looking at a system that has only a few mic head or element options for it, usually amounting to only one or two choices. Then you are also selecting a system, thinking about how many wireless frequencies you are going to be using, which also then limits your options when choosing a microphone or microphones.


More About Mike Anderson
Mike Anderson has for the past eight years worked full-time as both a technical director, and currently an assistant technical director, for two different churches. In addition, he has been both a professional drummer and audio engineer for the past 21 years. Working with many different artists along the way as a drummer, he has performed everything from jazz, rock, country, pop music. During this time, he also worked for different production companies and recording studios and started his own production company when living in Kansas City.
Get in Touch: MAnderson@blue-ridge.org    More by Mike Anderson

Latest Resource

Worship Facilities Magazine, September-October 2017
The September-October 2017 issue of Worship Facilities Magazine offers a glance at a Granger Community Church, and their recent install of a Lawo audio mixing console system.


Article Topics

Products · Technology · Audio · Team Management · Budgeting · Leadership · AKG · Audix · Clarity · Condenser · Dynamic · Feedback · All Topics

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